Jungian analytical psychology and the process

Unconscious mindCollective unconsciousand Archetypes The basic assumption is that the personal unconscious is a potent part — probably the more active part — of the normal human psyche. Reliable communication between the conscious and unconscious parts of the psyche is necessary for wholeness. Also crucial is the belief that dreams show ideas, beliefs, and feelings that individuals are not readily aware of but need to be, and that such material is expressed in a personalized vocabulary of visual metaphors.

Jungian analytical psychology and the process

There have been similar undertakings into the minds of Freud, Rogers, Adler and other forefathers of modern psychology. Each of these theories offer a unique perspective on the human personality.

What is presented is an overview of the thinking from what we call today the classic schools of psychology. These schools of thought or psychological theories were all developed in the first half of 20th century.

Most of these theories had a shared paradigm, which is the multi-tier view of the human mind. In addition to a shared paradigm, the methodology used by these psychologists includes to varying degree both scientific study and practical case experience.

The results of combining their theories are additive rather than paradigm shifting. He is best known for his work in developing the field of analytical psychology. According to Jung, it is individuation that is the central process of human development Individuation — A Definition From a linguistic point of view definition of terms and meaning introduces the potential for understanding.

While individuation has become the property of the world of psychology it is worth noting that Jung intended for it to be a much more than that. Jungian analytical psychology and the process him it encompasses the philosophical, mystical, and spiritual areas of the human being.

Here again, Jung applied another of the elements of the classic psychology paradigm; the freedom to rename and redefine within a limited scope those terms that apply to the work at hand.

In the broadest possible way, individuation can be defined as the achievement of self-actualization through a process of integrating the conscious and the unconscious. Once again, any accurate understanding of Jung should come from him. Jung and Freud As we venture forward there is an interesting linking between Jung and Freud.

In addition to the obvious one, their close proximity in the time that both were working on their projects, it was from about until they severed their ties, including their friendship in that Jung and Freud collaborated on their work.

Understanding Jung If there were ever an example of a work in progress, Jung provides it. As his work evolved he uncovered more and more subtleties needing development.

Jungian analytical psychology and the process

Here are but a few of his key ideas: One area of Jungian psychology that can become a bit overwhelming is his use of the archetype model.

In psychology, an archetype is a model of a person, personality, or behavior. Archetypes represent fundamental human motifs of our experience as we evolved; consequentially, they evoke deep emotions. The scope of archetypes is very broad. With many different archetypes, Jung relied on only a part of the congregate number.

He then further divided them into three set that symbolize basic human motivations. Each type has its own set of values, meanings and personality traits: Ego, Soul and Self. The types in each set share a common driving source, for example types within the Ego set are driven to fulfill ego-defined agendas.

Most, if not all, people have several archetypes at play in their personality construct. Jung postulated that each person carries dominate archetypes within. This is how self-actualization occurs. While Jung was and remains today an enigma of sorts, his impact on the field of psychology is enormous.

When viewed out of context many of his archetype descriptions can bring a smile to the face. Take this one of his many reports. It is about the presence of an unconscious duality within each of us called Anima and Animus, our true selves. Rogers practiced conversations with these figures arguing that each represents gender specific traits to help guide us.

That process looks like this: The next step in the process is the integration of the ego consciousness with the personal and collective self. The ego Personal unconscious Collective unconscious This results in identification of archetypes that shape and define the human experience.

Here are a few: Base for sexual and life instincts. Authority figure; stern; powerful. Longing for innocence; rebirth; salvation.Jungian analytical psychology sees the self as many things including psychic structure, developmental process, transcendental postulate, affective experience and archetype.

It has been depicted as the totality of body and mind, the God image, the experience of overpowering feelings, the union of opposites and a dynamic force which pilots the. Analytical psychology, or Jungian psychology: emphasizes the primary importance of the individual psyche and the personal quest for wholeness.

Analytical psychology approaches psychotherapy and depth analysis in the tradition established by the Swiss psychiatrist, C. G. Jung. As originally defined by Jung, it is distinguished by a focus on the roll of symbolic and spiritual experiences in human life, and rests on Jung’s theory of archetypes and the existence of a deep psychic space. Jungian Psychology’s Individuation Process. Jung believed each person is unique and has a distinct destiny. Most of Jungian psychology—also called analytical psychology or depth psychology—centers on what Jung later called the individuation process. Jungian therapy, sometimes known as Jungian analysis, is an in-depth, analytical form of talk therapy designed to bring together the conscious and unconscious parts of the mind to help a person.

Jungian Archetypes: One area of Jungian psychology that can become a bit overwhelming is his use of the archetype model. Jungian therapy, sometimes known as Jungian analysis, is an in-depth, analytical form of talk therapy designed to bring together the conscious and unconscious parts of the mind to help a person.

Jungian therapy, sometimes known as Jungian analysis, is an in-depth, analytical form of talk therapy designed to bring together the conscious and unconscious parts of the mind to help a person.

Analytical Psychology is the name given to the psychological-therapeutic system founded and developed by the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung (). Carl Jung was the son of a pastor in the Swiss Reformed Church, and many of his relatives were ministers too.

Analytical psychology approaches psychotherapy and depth analysis in the tradition established by the Swiss psychiatrist, C.

G. Jung. As originally defined by Jung, it is distinguished by a focus on the roll of symbolic and spiritual experiences in human life, and rests on Jung’s theory of archetypes and the existence of a deep psychic space.

Jung and his Individuation Process | Journal Psyche